audiokayness (the phantom annex)
generic-art:

Eric Joyner

generic-art:

Eric Joyner

70sscifiart:

Happy National Coffee Day

70sscifiart:

Happy National Coffee Day

visual-poetry:

from »the lewis carroll picture book« (1899)

sonails:

Chris Carter of Throbbing Gristle on his DIY analog synth and noise machine work during TG. Deep nerds only.

Kevin R. Seward - Unset
8 plays

Unset

Feedback via goofy amplification, speakers as mics, circuit bent Karaoke boombox.  AM radio theremin.  Monotron, toy echo mic, AM xmitter.

zumzeig:

 Art : Interview 

Keith Haring: Languages
by Andrew Blackley   Johanna Burton   Scott Treleaven


Ciphers, graffiti hieroglyphs, and lateral communication.
Scott Treleaven:  Well, I knew that Keith had a relationship with Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs—but I had never realized the extent of their influence until I saw the material from his SVA days that you’d shown me. Haring had collaborated with them both, and I knew he had looked up to them as mentors, but what struck me was the he actually followed Burroughs and Gysin’s instructions on how to break down language, how to attack restrictive language—the “language of control,” as they refer to it. Haring went through a whole step-by-step process that Burroughs and Gysin had laid out in The Third Mind that’s supposed to transcend syllabic language and create a kind of pictorial communication that could extend beyond the values of what sanctioned, syllabic language allowed. For someone like Keith, who had such a heavy mistrust of the politics of his era, to be able to insinuate his own agenda—whether it was about HIV, homosexuality, poverty, youth culture, or drug use, he was able to bring all of that material into a mainstream forum in a way that no one at the time had been able to do—it was a completely marginal, forbidden discourse, but he brought it into the mainstream. He did exactly what Burroughs and Gysin said you would be able to do if you followed their process. You would become a “hieroglyphic scribe,” transcending socio-cultural boundaries. Essentially, Haring demonstrated that Burroughs and Gysin were not just making up a bunch of Dadaist party-tricks. They made rules that actually produced real results. It’s basically a confirmation that “magic,” at least as Burroughs considered it, really does exist in art, and that his and Gysin’s view of reality turns out to be pretty close to the way things actually are. (laughter)
AB: The work of Burroughs and Gysin is key to this body of work. A collage was included in the exhibition that was created before Haring and Burroughs became friends. In this collage one of the elements is a section of an interview in which Burroughs is describing his approach to writing. Haring was already demonstrating a receptivity to Burroughs’s influence—
via: http://bombmagazine.org/article/1000216/keith-haring-languages

zumzeig:

Art : Interview

Ciphers, graffiti hieroglyphs, and lateral communication.

Scott Treleaven:  Well, I knew that Keith had a relationship with Brion Gysin and William S. Burroughs—but I had never realized the extent of their influence until I saw the material from his SVA days that you’d shown me. Haring had collaborated with them both, and I knew he had looked up to them as mentors, but what struck me was the he actually followed Burroughs and Gysin’s instructions on how to break down language, how to attack restrictive language—the “language of control,” as they refer to it. Haring went through a whole step-by-step process that Burroughs and Gysin had laid out in The Third Mind that’s supposed to transcend syllabic language and create a kind of pictorial communication that could extend beyond the values of what sanctioned, syllabic language allowed. For someone like Keith, who had such a heavy mistrust of the politics of his era, to be able to insinuate his own agenda—whether it was about HIV, homosexuality, poverty, youth culture, or drug use, he was able to bring all of that material into a mainstream forum in a way that no one at the time had been able to do—it was a completely marginal, forbidden discourse, but he brought it into the mainstream. He did exactly what Burroughs and Gysin said you would be able to do if you followed their process. You would become a “hieroglyphic scribe,” transcending socio-cultural boundaries. Essentially, Haring demonstrated that Burroughs and Gysin were not just making up a bunch of Dadaist party-tricks. They made rules that actually produced real results. It’s basically a confirmation that “magic,” at least as Burroughs considered it, really does exist in art, and that his and Gysin’s view of reality turns out to be pretty close to the way things actually are. (laughter)

AB: The work of Burroughs and Gysin is key to this body of work. A collage was included in the exhibition that was created before Haring and Burroughs became friends. In this collage one of the elements is a section of an interview in which Burroughs is describing his approach to writing. Haring was already demonstrating a receptivity to Burroughs’s influence—

via: http://bombmagazine.org/article/1000216/keith-haring-languages

SPEECH structures the abyss of mental and acoustic
space, shrouding the race, it is a cosmic, invisible architecture
of the human dark. Speak that I may see you.
WRITING turned a spotlight on the high, dim Sierras
of speech; writing was the visualization of acoustic space. It
lit up the dark. These five kings did a king to death.
_______________________________________
A goose’s quill put an end to talk, abolished mystery, gave
architecture and towns, brought roads and armies, bureaucracies.
It was the basic metaphor with which the cycle of
CIVILIZATION began, the step from the dark into the
light of the mind. The hand that filled a paper built a city.
MARSHALL McLUHAN, COUNTERBLAST (via vagabondbohemia)