audiokayness (the phantom annex)

As mentioned by moody alien somewhere’s on the interwebs.

Shoreditch: Experimental Music School 1969

[info from the link …]

Children from infant, secondary modern & comprehensive schools apply methods of contemporary music, including demonstrations of simple tape & electronic techniques. The children discuss with teacher how different sounds may be produced and experiment with electric circuits and loops on the tape recorder.

via Synthtopia

daveseidel:

Recorded in performance at 119 Gallery (Lowell, MA) on January 25, 2014.

I played a Shnth with processing and looping. The piece is in three sections. To make this version, I edited out the first couple of minutes of playing and added a fade-in at the beginning and a slight fade-out at the ending, but there was no other post-production other than conversion from 96K/32-bit WAV to 48K 320kpbs MP3.

The first section uses an 8-note scale devised by Lou Harrison, and the tones and chords are actuated by my breath as I blew into the Shnth’s built-in mic. The second section moves back and forth between two 6-note metaslendro scales played on the buttons of the Shnth. The third section returns to the Harrison scale, also played using the buttons.

The two channels of the Shnth’s stereo output went through two Grunge distortion pedals (used only in the third section), and were then combined into a single channel. This mono channel was split up and routed through a Moogerfooger Ring Modulator and a FreqBox in parallel, and then recombined along with the original signal and sent to a Moogerfooger Clusterflux, the stereo output of which went to a Deluxe Memory Man with Hazarai and finally a Boomerang III looper, both in stereo. I used an Ekdahl Moisturizer reverb unit on the mixer’s FX bus. The recording was made directly off the mixer. All the nutty routing was facilitated by a Repeater Electronics 4x4 passive matrix mixer — a very helpful device.

The Boomerang III loops throughout in pseudo-Frippertronics fashion. In the second section, the Deluxe Memory Man is temporarily switched into a similar mode, but with a different loop duration, which allowed me to build up clouds of notes that were only approximately predictable (similar to the technique used in Collider). In the first and third sections, the Deluxe Memory Man is used more like a flanger.

Here’s a photo of the setup (taken at home before the gig): http://www.flickr.com/photos/seidel/12135979426/

The image is from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DNA-RNA_D-loops,_greatly_exaggerated.jpg

Having used one groovy program from hereabouts, I noticed that another one, PixiVisor, has been updated. 

from the link:


PixiVisor is a revolutionary tool for audio-visual experiments. Simple and fun, cross-platform application with unlimited potential for creativity!
It consists of two parts: Transmitter and Receiver.
Transmitter converts the low-resolution video (static image or GIF animation) to sound, pixel by pixel (progressive scan). This lets you listen to the sound of your image. But the main function of the Transmitter is to transmit the signal to the receiving devices.
Receiver converts the sound (from microphone or Line-in input) back to video. You can set the color palette for this video, and record it to animated GIF file.

listentothisnoise:

What’s the resonant frequency of your eyes? What about your chest? The human body has a lot of little resonances that can come into play when trying to model the effect of sound and vibrations on humans. Rattling at the resonant frequency of the eye, for example, can make vision difficult or make a person sick. I personally, have been nauseated by bass music that rattled my chest. The above image shows the various resonant frequencies for the human body (modeling a person as a collection of masses and springs). Sound might not make your head explode, but at the right frequencies it can certainly make you uncomfortable. (Photo Credit: Sven-Olof Emanuelsson, Via: Power Standards Lab)

listentothisnoise:

What’s the resonant frequency of your eyes? What about your chest? The human body has a lot of little resonances that can come into play when trying to model the effect of sound and vibrations on humans. Rattling at the resonant frequency of the eye, for example, can make vision difficult or make a person sick. I personally, have been nauseated by bass music that rattled my chest. The above image shows the various resonant frequencies for the human body (modeling a person as a collection of masses and springs). Sound might not make your head explode, but at the right frequencies it can certainly make you uncomfortable. (Photo Credit: Sven-Olof Emanuelsson, Via: Power Standards Lab)

Gleaned from the link:



. . unlike a piano, it has no hammered dulcimers.Instead, there are four spinning wheels wrapped in horse tail hair, like violin bows. To turn them, Zubrzycki pumps a peddle below the keyboard connected to a crankshaft.

As he tinkles the keys, they press the strings down onto the wheels emitting rich, sonorous tones reminiscent of a cello, an organ and even an accordion.

The Feedback Organ

via

midcenturymodernfreak:

Flea Market Finds

During our visit to the flea market, our eyes zeroed in on this 1979 SUPERSCOPE (Marantz) Model C-202LP that was almost buried in a tangled pile of electrical cords, old cameras, and other gizmos. This unit is surprisingly in pristine condition, thanks in part to the plastic case it came with. Everything is in working order with bonus features including a pitch control knob, and tone/record level controls. With a few boxes of our 1990s mixtapes in storage, this solid cassette player will certainly come in handy for listening and converting content digitally!

Price after haggling…$8

Via

Collider