audiokayness (the phantom annex)

not a rug

lotrlockedwhovian:

I WANT THIS AT WORK

lotrlockedwhovian:

I WANT THIS AT WORK

lines necessary


To write a groundbreaking art house rom-com:

"I’m Steinbeck, dammit!  Leave me alone!"

To lovingly craft an artisanal fibercentric MacGyver reboot:

"Cardboard won’t save you now."

To open the 13th draft of my bio pic:

"I believe in unicorns, leprechauns and split infinitives."

To pitch a blockbuster 3D remake of The Last Movie:

"That’s plenny enough to fulfill the ancient prophesies … "

T-shirts and chapbooks available in the lobby.

Did Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville record Abraham Lincoln’s voice on a phonautograph in the White House in 1863? We often get asked about this persistent rumor. The answer: we have seen no solid evidence that such a recording session ever took place, and we can trace the rumor itself back only a few decades.

Every artist at some point had to decide that they didn’t have to justify themselves to the people around them.
Cheryl Strayed (via halfgreekgoddess)

When I got to seventh grade, they had a psychologist come to school and put us through a bunch of adjustment tests. He showed me twenty different flashcards, one by one, and asked me what was wrong with the pictures. They all seemed fine to me, but he insisted and showed me the first picture again—the one with the kid in it. “What’s wrong with this picture?” he asked in a tired voice. I told him the picture seemed fine. He got really mad and said, “Can’t you see the boy in the picture doesn’t have any ears?” The truth is that when I looked at the picture again, I did see that the kid had no ears. But the picture still seemed fine to me. The psychologist classed me as “suffering from severe perceptual disorders,” and had me transferred to carpentry school. When I got there, it turned out I was allergic to sawdust, so they transferred me to metalworking class. I was pretty good at it, but I didn’t really enjoy it. To tell the truth, I didn’t really enjoy anything in particular. When I finished school, I started working in a factory that made pipes. My boss was an engineer with a diploma from a top technical college. A brilliant guy. If you showed him a picture of a kid without ears or something like that, he’d figure it out in no time.

After work I’d stay on at the factory and make myself odd-shaped pipes, winding ones that looked like curled-up snakes, and I’d roll marbles through them. I know it sounds like a dumb thing to do, and I didn’t even enjoy it, but I went on doing it anyway.

One night I made a pipe that was really complicated, with lots of twists and turns in it, and when I rolled a marble in, it didn’t come out at the other end. At first I thought it was just stuck in the middle, but after I tried it with about twenty more marbles, I realized they were simply disappearing. I know that everything I say sounds kind of stupid. I mean everyone knows that marbles don’t just disappear, but when I saw the marbles go in at one end of the pipe and not come out at the other end, it didn’t even strike me as strange. It seemed perfectly ok actually. That was when I decided to make myself a bigger pipe, in the same shape, and to crawl into it until I disappeared. When the idea came to me, I was so happy that I started laughing out loud. I think it was the first time in my entire life that I laughed.

From that day on, I worked on my giant pipe. Every evening I’d work on it, and in the morning I’d hide the parts in the storeroom. It took me twenty days to finish making it. On the last night it took me five hours to assemble it, and it took up about half the shop floor.

When I saw it all in one piece, waiting for me, I remembered my social studies teacher who said once that the first human being to use a club wasn’t the strongest person in his tribe or the smartest. It’s just that the others didn’t need club, while he did. He needed a club more than anyone, to survive and to make up for being weak. I don’t think there was another human being in the whole world who wanted to disappear more than I did, and that’s why it was me that invented the pipe. Me, and not that brilliant engineer with his technical college degree who runs the factory.

I started crawling inside the pipe, with no idea about what to expect at the other end. Maybe there would be kids there without ears, sitting on mounds of marbles. Could be. I don’t know exactly what happened after I passed a certain point in the pipe. All I know is that I’m here.

I think I’m an angel now. I mean, I’ve got wings, and this circle over my head and there are hundreds more here like me. When I got here they were sitting around playing with the marbles I’d rolled through the pipe a few weeks earlier.

I always used to think that Heaven is a place for people who’ve spent their whole life being good, but it isn’t. God is too merciful and kind to make a decision like that. Heaven is simply a place for people who were genuinely unable to be happy on earth. They told me here that people who kill themselves return to live their life all over again, because the fact that they didn’t like it the first time doesn’t mean they won’t fit in the second time. But the ones who really don’t fit in the world wind up here. They each have their own way of getting to Heaven.

There are pilots who got here by performing a loop at one precise point in the Bermuda Triangle. There are housewives who went through the back of their kitchen cabinets to get here, and mathematicians who found topological distortions in space and had to squeeze through them to get here. So if you’re really unhappy down there, and if all kinds of people are telling you that you’re suffering from severe perceptual disorders, look for your own way of getting here, and when you find it, could you please bring some cards, cause we’re getting pretty tired of the marbles.

"Pipes" - Etgar Keret  (via catvonnegut)

File under (Sound Creation) Architecture as Idiom & vice versa.  Likewise [Lost &] Found In Action.  As well as Go Along To Play Along.  And so on, no need to stop …

From the link (found via Dataisnature):



The German philosopher Martin Heidegger thought that this absorbed, non-theoretical mode of activity offers a way of understanding the world that is more fundamental than detached and theoretical analysis. Heidegger argues that the privileging of detached theoretical reflection over absorbed activity is a fundamental error at the origin of Western thought, one that casts a shadow over Western society and culture.

I think the circuit bending movement shows an emphasis on absorbed activity over detached theoretical reflection, and a preference for active, perhaps unpredictable systems, not the subservient machines dreamt of by Thomas Dolby.


Oh, hail yeah, ibid. & out of sequence in a slapdash heyhere’shopingyoureadthiswhenthetimepresentsitself way:

If we accept Latour’s position, and in the light of Heidegger’s standpoint, we can see Phuture’s encounter with the 303 not as one driven by error, confusion or breakdown, but as an absorbed exploration, and a series of ‘what if?’ questions that lead to a non-theoretical understanding of the system. Here, decisions are not made in resistance to what is encountered, but in response to it.

Maybe, I’ll read it now.

Eno is widely known for coining the term “ambient music,” and he produced a clutch of critically revered albums in the nineteen-seventies and eighties—by the Talking Heads, David Bowie, and U2, among others—but if I had to choose his greatest contribution to popular music it would be the idea that musicians do their best work when they have no idea what they’re doing. As he told Keyboard, in 1981, “Any constraint is part of the skeleton that you build the composition on—including your own incompetence.” The genius of Eno is in removing the idea of genius. His work is rooted in the power of collaboration within systems: instructions, rules, and self-imposed limits. His methods are a rebuke to the assumption that a project can be powered by one person’s intent, or that intent is even worth worrying about.
A first grader should understand that his or her culture isn’t a rational invention; that there are thousands of other cultures and they all work pretty well; that all cultures function on faith rather than truth; that there are lots of alternatives to our own society. Cultural relativity is defensible and attractive. It’s also a source of hope. It means we don’t have to continue this way if we don’t like it.
Kurt Vonnegut, Playboy interview 1973 (via boom-bap)

From the link:

We’ll be collectively reading and talking the out-of-print volume An Individual Note of Music, Sound and Electronics by composer, theoretician, philosopher, and studio manager Daphne Oram, perhaps best known for her pioneering efforts in the BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop… 

Originally published in 1971, An Individual Note is available as a free PDF download here:

http://www.ubu.com/historical/oram/index.html